felixandria:

haircuts

mediocre-latinist:

I was really scared that May would end up dead during that fight scene but no the directors/writers let an Asian woman beat up a white dude and survive and didn’t have a redemptory arc for the white dude just made him look super pathetic like not even a tough bad guy basically I wasn’t let down by this show

Also apparently Agent May is the only human who can hold the berserker staff without serious psychological damage and that’s cool.  And it was totally foreshadowed.

I am going to go watch that movie “Land Before Time”

I’m board but I also don’t want to move, you feel me?

There is a ton of preasure in my ears and I can’t figure out why. I’m barely conjusted right now

italktosnakes:

ehmeegee:

mellowblueness:

VidCon’s agenda went live recently, and I found myself curious about the degree of equal gender* representation – of the conference generally, but especially of the panels. Panels are a platform, literally, given to people perceived as legitimate and qualified to give advice; they’re a quick measure of whose opinions we value on what topics. And the representation of women on these panels is horrifyingly low.
As with everything related to media, representation matters. The lack of women on these panels both reflects and perpetrates a refusal to acknowledge the validity of women’s voices, experiences, and expertise. This is especially dangerous given the statistically young and female demographic who’ll be watching these panels at VidCon. VidCon could be an opportunity to catalyze a shift towards valuing everyone instead of, overwhelmingly, cis white men… But if the People In Charge ever DO decide to live up to that moral obligation, they certainly won’t be doing so at this year’s conference.
Below is a full list of which panels fit into the categories detailed in the above charts. If you don’t feel like reading that entire list, here are a few “highlights”:
Of the 4 all-women panels, all 4 of them are heavily gendered: “Beauty Bloggers”; “Women on YouTube”; “Starting A Beauty Channel”; “A Focus on Beauty”
Of five panelists, there are 0 women on the “Online Gaming Strategies” panel
Of eight panelists, there are 0 women on the “Faceless Channels” panel
Of seven panelists, there is 1 woman on the “YouTube and Your Music Career” panel
Of eight panelists, there is 1 woman on the “Writing Comedy for YouTube” panel
* a similar report on the representation of POC on VidCon panels will be coming shortly. Spoiler alert: it’s even worse than this one.
FULL LIST OF PANELS**:
Read More

I participated on 4 panels/discussions this year: “Women on YouTube,” “Education + Entertainment: Is it possible?,” “Sexism on YouTube,” and The Brain Scoop Q&A. 
There is a lot that can be changed and improved about the makeup of the panels at a convention as large and far-reaching as VidCon. I understand scheduling is a complicated process, but having the “Women on YouTube” panel occur at the same time as “The Future of Online Video” left a bitter taste in my mouth. While I’m proud to sit on a panel with some of my personal heroes and friends on “Education + Entertainment,” I can’t help but feel a sense of awkwardness at being the only woman up there. My opinions do not represent the entirety of women educators in online video. 
We also run into a frustrating problem with feeling as though we’re preaching to the choir on the “Sexism” and “Women on YT” panels - while those may arguably some of the most important discussions occurring during the convention, we’re not attracting audiences that otherwise wouldn’t be inspired to attend. When I went to ScienceOnline the first 4 hours of the conference was devoted to issues of gender and race representation inequality - so if you didn’t go to any panels you were actively choosing not to participate in the first quarter of the conference. I’m not suggesting we force people to go to a panel they don’t want to - but structuring the timing of these discussions in such a way sends an encouraging message of support from the convention organizers. It is powerful.
Next year, it’d be great to see “Women on YouTube” on the mainstage.  I would love to have a few men participate in the discussion. Let’s not see the ‘Future of Online Video’ represented solely by men. When you ask how you can help women reach a more equal platform, the answer is that you speak up, and you participate. We need your voices. 

It’s my dream so see Women on YouTube on the mainstage. This post is so important and so interesting, and I had a lot of trouble with the overlapping of important panels at VidCon 2014 as well. I understand that VidCon is a huge convention and scheduling is tricky the way it is, but with what’s been going on in our community lately, I would have loved to see a bit more support behind talking about safety, abuse and other relevant issues on the main stage. Many of the people who could use these types of panels the most are not the ones who would voluntarily elect to attend them. italktosnakes:

ehmeegee:

mellowblueness:

VidCon’s agenda went live recently, and I found myself curious about the degree of equal gender* representation – of the conference generally, but especially of the panels. Panels are a platform, literally, given to people perceived as legitimate and qualified to give advice; they’re a quick measure of whose opinions we value on what topics. And the representation of women on these panels is horrifyingly low.
As with everything related to media, representation matters. The lack of women on these panels both reflects and perpetrates a refusal to acknowledge the validity of women’s voices, experiences, and expertise. This is especially dangerous given the statistically young and female demographic who’ll be watching these panels at VidCon. VidCon could be an opportunity to catalyze a shift towards valuing everyone instead of, overwhelmingly, cis white men… But if the People In Charge ever DO decide to live up to that moral obligation, they certainly won’t be doing so at this year’s conference.
Below is a full list of which panels fit into the categories detailed in the above charts. If you don’t feel like reading that entire list, here are a few “highlights”:
Of the 4 all-women panels, all 4 of them are heavily gendered: “Beauty Bloggers”; “Women on YouTube”; “Starting A Beauty Channel”; “A Focus on Beauty”
Of five panelists, there are 0 women on the “Online Gaming Strategies” panel
Of eight panelists, there are 0 women on the “Faceless Channels” panel
Of seven panelists, there is 1 woman on the “YouTube and Your Music Career” panel
Of eight panelists, there is 1 woman on the “Writing Comedy for YouTube” panel
* a similar report on the representation of POC on VidCon panels will be coming shortly. Spoiler alert: it’s even worse than this one.
FULL LIST OF PANELS**:
Read More

I participated on 4 panels/discussions this year: “Women on YouTube,” “Education + Entertainment: Is it possible?,” “Sexism on YouTube,” and The Brain Scoop Q&A. 
There is a lot that can be changed and improved about the makeup of the panels at a convention as large and far-reaching as VidCon. I understand scheduling is a complicated process, but having the “Women on YouTube” panel occur at the same time as “The Future of Online Video” left a bitter taste in my mouth. While I’m proud to sit on a panel with some of my personal heroes and friends on “Education + Entertainment,” I can’t help but feel a sense of awkwardness at being the only woman up there. My opinions do not represent the entirety of women educators in online video. 
We also run into a frustrating problem with feeling as though we’re preaching to the choir on the “Sexism” and “Women on YT” panels - while those may arguably some of the most important discussions occurring during the convention, we’re not attracting audiences that otherwise wouldn’t be inspired to attend. When I went to ScienceOnline the first 4 hours of the conference was devoted to issues of gender and race representation inequality - so if you didn’t go to any panels you were actively choosing not to participate in the first quarter of the conference. I’m not suggesting we force people to go to a panel they don’t want to - but structuring the timing of these discussions in such a way sends an encouraging message of support from the convention organizers. It is powerful.
Next year, it’d be great to see “Women on YouTube” on the mainstage.  I would love to have a few men participate in the discussion. Let’s not see the ‘Future of Online Video’ represented solely by men. When you ask how you can help women reach a more equal platform, the answer is that you speak up, and you participate. We need your voices. 

It’s my dream so see Women on YouTube on the mainstage. This post is so important and so interesting, and I had a lot of trouble with the overlapping of important panels at VidCon 2014 as well. I understand that VidCon is a huge convention and scheduling is tricky the way it is, but with what’s been going on in our community lately, I would have loved to see a bit more support behind talking about safety, abuse and other relevant issues on the main stage. Many of the people who could use these types of panels the most are not the ones who would voluntarily elect to attend them.

italktosnakes:

ehmeegee:

mellowblueness:

VidCon’s agenda went live recently, and I found myself curious about the degree of equal gender* representation – of the conference generally, but especially of the panels. Panels are a platform, literally, given to people perceived as legitimate and qualified to give advice; they’re a quick measure of whose opinions we value on what topics. And the representation of women on these panels is horrifyingly low.

As with everything related to media, representation matters. The lack of women on these panels both reflects and perpetrates a refusal to acknowledge the validity of women’s voices, experiences, and expertise. This is especially dangerous given the statistically young and female demographic who’ll be watching these panels at VidCon. VidCon could be an opportunity to catalyze a shift towards valuing everyone instead of, overwhelmingly, cis white men… But if the People In Charge ever DO decide to live up to that moral obligation, they certainly won’t be doing so at this year’s conference.

Below is a full list of which panels fit into the categories detailed in the above charts. If you don’t feel like reading that entire list, here are a few “highlights”:

  • Of the 4 all-women panels, all 4 of them are heavily gendered: “Beauty Bloggers”; “Women on YouTube”; “Starting A Beauty Channel”; “A Focus on Beauty”
  • Of five panelists, there are 0 women on the “Online Gaming Strategies” panel
  • Of eight panelists, there are 0 women on the “Faceless Channels” panel
  • Of seven panelists, there is 1 woman on the “YouTube and Your Music Career” panel
  • Of eight panelists, there is 1 woman on the “Writing Comedy for YouTube” panel

* a similar report on the representation of POC on VidCon panels will be coming shortly. Spoiler alert: it’s even worse than this one.

FULL LIST OF PANELS**:

Read More

I participated on 4 panels/discussions this year: “Women on YouTube,” “Education + Entertainment: Is it possible?,” “Sexism on YouTube,” and The Brain Scoop Q&A. 

There is a lot that can be changed and improved about the makeup of the panels at a convention as large and far-reaching as VidCon. I understand scheduling is a complicated process, but having the “Women on YouTube” panel occur at the same time as “The Future of Online Video” left a bitter taste in my mouth. While I’m proud to sit on a panel with some of my personal heroes and friends on “Education + Entertainment,” I can’t help but feel a sense of awkwardness at being the only woman up there. My opinions do not represent the entirety of women educators in online video. 

We also run into a frustrating problem with feeling as though we’re preaching to the choir on the “Sexism” and “Women on YT” panels - while those may arguably some of the most important discussions occurring during the convention, we’re not attracting audiences that otherwise wouldn’t be inspired to attend. When I went to ScienceOnline the first 4 hours of the conference was devoted to issues of gender and race representation inequality - so if you didn’t go to any panels you were actively choosing not to participate in the first quarter of the conference. I’m not suggesting we force people to go to a panel they don’t want to - but structuring the timing of these discussions in such a way sends an encouraging message of support from the convention organizers. It is powerful.

Next year, it’d be great to see “Women on YouTube” on the mainstage.  I would love to have a few men participate in the discussion. Let’s not see the ‘Future of Online Video’ represented solely by men. When you ask how you can help women reach a more equal platform, the answer is that you speak up, and you participate. We need your voices. 

It’s my dream so see Women on YouTube on the mainstage. This post is so important and so interesting, and I had a lot of trouble with the overlapping of important panels at VidCon 2014 as well. I understand that VidCon is a huge convention and scheduling is tricky the way it is, but with what’s been going on in our community lately, I would have loved to see a bit more support behind talking about safety, abuse and other relevant issues on the main stage. Many of the people who could use these types of panels the most are not the ones who would voluntarily elect to attend them.

slimegalaxy:

I just discovered the term “spectrumslide” as an alternative to the term “genderbend” and I REALLY think people should start using it and loving it as much as I do. It takes into account both the gender and sex spectrums, so not only is it not transphobic, it also is a lot more interesting and fun to experiment with.

There’s also cis(s)wap, for that thing where they take a cisgendered man and make her into a cisgender women. Other wise bodysawp, for when you take a cisgender man and make him into either a trans man or intersex man. Or the standard genderswap to literally mean something like a cisgender man turned into a transwoman.

okay, but for real, it’s 5:13 and I haven’t stopped being productive since I woke up this morning.

I have gone from doing no work at all and matharoning a TV show to do nothing but work.

"They call us now.
Before they drop the bombs.
The phone rings
and someone who knows my first name
calls and says in perfect Arabic
“This is David.”
And in my stupor of sonic booms and glass shattering symphonies
still smashing around in my head
I think “Do I know any Davids in Gaza?”
They call us now to say
Run.
You have 58 seconds from the end of this message.
Your house is next.
They think of it as some kind of war time courtesy.
It doesn’t matter that
there is nowhere to run to.
It means nothing that the borders are closed
and your papers are worthless
and mark you only for a life sentence
in this prison by the sea
and the alleyways are narrow
and there are more human lives
packed one against the other
more than any other place on earth
Just run.
We aren’t trying to kill you.
It doesn’t matter that
you can’t call us back to tell us
the people we claim to want aren’t in your house
that there’s no one here
except you and your children
who were cheering for Argentina
sharing the last loaf of bread for this week
counting candles left in case the power goes out.
It doesn’t matter that you have children.
You live in the wrong place
and now is your chance to run
to nowhere.
It doesn’t matter
that 58 seconds isn’t long enough
to find your wedding album
or your son’s favorite blanket
or your daughter’s almost completed college application
or your shoes
or to gather everyone in the house.
It doesn’t matter what you had planned.
It doesn’t matter who you are
Prove you’re human.
Prove you stand on two legs.
Run."
— "Running Orders" by Lena Khalaf Tuffaha (via theremina)

(Source: facebook.com)

mrsmarisacoulter:

adorablyrotten:

summoner-rena:

IF YOU ARE STREAMING, DON’T USE PROCASTER.

DON’T. USE. PROCASTER.

Livestream procaster consumes large amounts of cpu for nothing. No joke, nothing. As a result your stream can become laggy and sometimes it can damage your…

marilynhanson:

i was gonna make a joke and just say “gaaaaaaaay” but like seriously

how many heterosexual sixteen-year-old boys do you know who will outright ignore the attention of girls? sirius is arrogant and haughty and he likes being at the center of attention; all of those traits indicate that he should be feeding off of the girls’ attention, flirting with them, or something, but he doesn’t. he ignores it and remains bored. sirius is utterly uninterested in women.

even in deathly hallows, where we get the only other hint vaguely related to his sexuality — the posters of girls in bikinis he put up as a teenager — harry immediately makes the connection that sirius put them up to piss off his parents.

there’s not much in the books that references sirius’s sexuality, but the little that does very much seems to imply that he was super disinterested in women.